Babcia’s Old Fashioned Onion Skin Dyed Eggs

Kraszanki – Old Fashioned Onion Skin Dyed Easter Eggs

Materials:
Raw White Eggs (Room Temperature)
Onion Skins (Brown, Red, Purple Or Mixed Skins)
//As Many Skins As Possible//
3 Tablespoons of Vinegar OR 3 Tablespoons of Salt
6 Cups Water
Porcelain Pot with Lid
Paper Towels
Bacon Fat OR Vegetable Oil

Directions:
1) Place onion skins and water into a porcelain pot. 2) Bring mixture to a boil, reduce and simmer for 30 minutes. 2) Cool onion skin dye and remove skins (strain liquid). 3) Add vinegar OR salt to the onion skin dye. 4) Layer raw, room temperature eggs into the liquid. 4) Bring eggs in onion skin dye to a boil, cover and reduce heat to a simmer. 5) Simmer for 20 minutes, turn off heat and let eggs cool in the onion skin dye. 6) Remove cooked, dyed, cooled eggs and blot with paper towels. 7) When dry and cool, rub dyed eggs with bacon fat or vegetable oil. 8) Proudly add to your “Swieconka” Easter Basket or table.

Variations Of Kraszanki

Marbleized* Onion Skin Dyed Easter Eggs

Materials:
Raw White Eggs (Room Temperature)
Onion Skins (Brown, Red, Purple Or Mixed Skins)
//As Many Skins As Possible//
3 Tablespoons of Vinegar OR 3 Tablespoons of Salt
6 Cups Water
Porcelain Pot with Lid
Paper Towels
Bacon Fat OR Vegetable Oil
Cheese Cloth or Cotton cloth
Twist Ties

Directions:
1) Take a 3 inch by 3 inch square of cotton, nylon or cheese cloth. 2) Take a raw white egg and wrap the onion skins around the raw egg. 3) Place the egg in the center of the cloth and bring the edges together, securing the onion skins around the egg. 4) Twist the cloth to form a tightly wrapped egg. 5) Secure the twisted egg with a twist tie. 6) Place 6 cups of water and salt OR vinegar in a large porcelain pot. 6) Bring wrapped egg to a boil, cover and reduce heat to a simmer. 5) Simmer for 20 minutes, turn off heat and let eggs cool in the onion skin dye. 6) Remove cooled eggs from the hot water and untwist the cloths to reveal a the marbleized pattern. 7) When dry, rub dyed eggs with bacon fat or vegetable oil. Enjoy a beautiful marbled egg!

*To create leaf imprinted eggs, arrange flat leafed parsley around the egg and secure leaves with cloth and twist ties. Proceed as above beginning with step #6.

Variations Of Kraszanki

Onion Skin Dyed Easter Eggs For Kids

Materials:
Raw White Eggs (Room Temperature)
Wide Rubber Bands Or Surgical Tape
Onion Skins (Brown, Red Or Purple Skins)
//As Many Skins As Possible//
3 Tablespoons of Vinegar OR 3 Tablespoons of Salt
6 Cups Water
Porcelain Pot with Lid
Paper Towels
Bacon Fat OR Vegetable Oil

Directions:
1) Take a raw white egg and position WIDE rubber bands around the raw egg to create a pleasing pattern. Surgical tape may be also be used to create bands around the eggs. 2) Place eggs in prepared, strained onion skin dye. 3) Cook eggs as directed above (Old Fashioned Onion Skin Dyed Eggs) beginning with step #4. 4) When eggs are cooked and desired shade of dye is achieved, remove from dye and cool. 5) Remove rubber bands or tape from each egg to reveal a beautiful geometric pattern. 6) Dry eggs and rub eggs with bacon fat or vegetable oil.

Remembering Poland’s Wojciech Kilar (1932-2013)

Remembering Poland’s outstanding pianist & composer Wojciech Kilar (1932-2013)

From the Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Chicago

Wojciech Kilar, Poland’s renowned pianist and composer of classical music and scores for many films, e.g. Roman Polanski’s Oscar-winning “The Pianist” and Francis Ford Coppola’s “Bram Stoker’s Dracula,” died on Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013 in Katowice.

Wojciech Kilar is considered one of the co-founders of the highly regarded Polish Composers’ School. He cooperated with many Polish and foreign film directors, including: Roman Polanski, Krzysztof Kieslowski, Andrzej Wajda, Kazimierz Kutz, Krzysztof Zanussi, Jane Campion and Francis Ford Coppola.

Kilar composed scores for more than 100 masterpieces of the world cinema. His music for “Dracula” won him the Best Score Composer award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. He also received the French national film award César for Roman Polanski Oscar-winning “The Pianist.”

For his outstanding contributions to the Polish culture he was awarded, among others, Poland’s highest decoration, The Order of the White Eagle from Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski.

Wojciech Kilar was born in 1932 in Lvov, a then-Polish city, now in Ukraine. He spent his childhood in Rzeszow and Krakow in southern Poland before moving to Katowice in Poland’s region of Upper Silesia, where he lived most of his life and which he considered his “little homeland.” He was also deeply attached to Czestochowa where he often celebrated his birthdays.

Wojciech Kilar graduated with top honors from the State Music Academy in Katowice in 1955. He launched his career in the late 1950s. From the early 1960s he co-founded, together the renowned Krzysztof Penderecki and Henryk Mikolaj Gorecki, the Polish avant-garde school and a new approach to musical composition in contemporary music called sonorism.

“Over the past half a century Wojciech Kilar’s symphonic, sacral and film music accompanied us nearly every day. Sometimes we are not aware that a well-known motif or theme was written by Wojciech Kilar. He was a widely admired artist,” said Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski.

“Wojciech Kilar was a leading world-class composer. His works are characterized by quality, diversity and perfection,” said Bogdan Zdrojewski, Poland’s Minister for Culture and National Heritage.

“Poland has lost one of the most individual voices in 20th and 21st-century music,” said Jerzy Kornowicz, Chairman of the Polish Composers’ Union.

Wojciech Kilar will be buried in Katowice on Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014.

More at the Consulate’s website: www.chicago.mfa.gov.pl
Facebook: Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Chicago
Twitter: @PLinChicago

Falcon Polish Heritage Quiz

Try your hand at winning one of three Polish cookbooks by taking part in this year’s Falcon Polish Heritage Quiz! First prize is Polish Holiday Cookery (248 pages), a collection of favorite easy-to-follow recipes for Polish-style Christmas, Easter, weddings, dinner parties, Polonian festivals and other festive occasions. The second prize is the Pleasing Polish Recipes (160 pages), all the Old Polish favorites with plenty of historical and cultural tidbits thrown in. The winner of the third prize will receive Culinary Traditions of Mazovia, Kashubia and Silesia (60 pages), a color-illustrated compendium of beloved regional dishes with all recipes printed side by side in both Polish and English.

To be eligible, please write your name and mailing address at the top of a sheet of paper and indicate the letter a, b or c which correctly answers the following questions:

1. Poland’s best-known living composer is:
a) Ignacy Paderewski
b) Krzysztof Penderecki
c) Karol Szymanowski

2. The oldest Polish-American insurance fraternal is the:
a) Polish National Alliance
b) Polish Roman Catholic Union
c) Polish Falcons of America

3. In the late 16th century Poland’s capital was moved to Warsaw from:
a) Poznań
b) Kraków
c) Gniezno

4. According to Polish tradition, the happiest marriages are those sacramentalized in the months of:
a) February, May and July
b) March, June and December
c) April, July and November

5. In present-day Poland the Feast of the Assumption (August 15) is also celebrated as:
a) Polish Independence Day
b) Polish Army Day
c) Polish Constitution Day

Airmail your replies without delay to:

Falcon Polish Heritage Quiz
ul. Kaniowska 24
01-529 Warsaw, Poland
or e-mail them to: research60@gmail.com.

All correct entries will take part in a random drawing to determine the winners.

Powodzenia – Good luck!